Monday, June 13, 2011

56 In Stores This Week (with Interviews & Giveaways)

This week's books are HOT! Just see for yourself...

This Week's Interviews

Passion (Fallen) by Lauren Kate
  • From Goodreads: "Every single lifetime, I'll choose you. Just as you have chosen me. Forever." Luce would die for Daniel. And she has. Over and over again. Throughout time, Luce and Daniel have found each other, only to be painfully torn apart: Luce dead, Daniel left broken and alone. But perhaps it doesn’t need to be that way. . . . Luce is certain that something—or someone—in a past life can help her in her present one. So she begins the most important journey of this lifetime . . . going back eternities to witness firsthand her romances with Daniel . . . and finally unlock the key to making their love last. Cam and the legions of angels and Outcasts are desperate to catch Luce, but none are as frantic as Daniel. He chases Luce through their shared pasts, terrified of what might happen if she rewrites history. Because their romance for the ages could go up in flames . . . forever.
How long did you work on this book?
The first draft takes me about three very intense months of writing. Then I go away from it for a while, and when I come back, I do about a month of revision, which always ends up changing my books entirely.

How was your journey to publication? Long, short, how many rejections?
Long at first, but once things began to happen, they moved quickly. I have been sending out work since I was about seventeen, getting a short story published here or there, but mostly a lot (a LOT) of rejection letters. I was 27 when I signed my first book contract, for The Betrayal of Natalie Hargrove. This was before I even had an agent though. The agent came shortly after that, and then the deal for the Fallen series, which changed and took over my life. I mean that in the best sense of the words.

What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?
Be an enigma and never give up.


What has surprised you most about becoming a published author?
The writing doesn't easier. It changes--you develop different strengths and pick up some new weaknesses. I've written six books now and it's just as tough today as it was when I was working on the first one. But you know, when it's rewarding--those too-rare moments of true inspiration--it's still just as indescribably wonderful as it was in the beginning.

The Dead: An Enemy Novel by Charlie Higson
  • From Goodreads: THE DEAD begins one year before the action in THE ENEMY, just after the Disaster. A terrible disease has struck everyone over the age of sixteen, leaving them either dead or a decomposing, flesh-eating creature. The action starts in a boarding school just outside London where all the teachers have turned into zombies. Together they begin a terrifying journey to find safety, and home.
How long did you work on this book?
For some reason, no matter what I’m aiming for when I start out, all my books seem to come out at the same length, which is about 90,000 words, and just to type that many words takes some time, especially when you are not a very good typist like me. So, from sitting down one Monday morning and tapping out the first words on my computer to the manuscript finally being ready for publication, it takes me a year to write a book. About half that time will be spent writing a first draft, then I will do a second draft – a complete rewrite – and this will be followed by at least two more drafts based on notes from my editor at the publisher, then the copy editor’s notes, then the proof reader’s... Along the way there will be meetings to discuss the cover, publicity, marketing, etc. I also do lots of events and school visits, which take up time. During the year I will however find time for a couple of other projects – I work in TV and radio as well – and I will of course be thinking about the next book, and the one after that…
How was your journey to publication? Long, short, how many rejections?
Well, I suppose you could say the journey to publication for The Dead was 40 years! I started writing when I was about 10 years old. Little books and things, then wrote longer novels all through my teenage and university years. Eventually when I was in my late twenties I wrote a book that I thought someone else might want to read. It was a crime thriller called King Of The Ants and was probably my 6th or 7th completed novel. That book was published in 1991. I found it quite easy to get published – I had a profile as a successful TV comedy writer so I was considered ‘marketable’ (even though the book was not a comedy. Publishers are always looking for authors they can ‘sell’. Publishing is as much a business as any other.) The fact is, though, that having spent so much of my life ‘practicing’, the novel was reasonably accomplished. I managed to find a good agent who put me together with a sympathetic publisher. On the back of that I wrote 3 more adult books in the early 90s and then my TV work took over (I co-created, wrote and performed on a comedy show called the Fast Show – there are loads of clips on Youtube if you’re interested). I returned to books a few years ago when I was offered the job of writing the Young James Bond series. As it was James Bond we had no trouble finding a publisher. The books have sold very well, so my publishers were keen on my new zombie series, which luckily is also doing rather well. I don’t want it to look like I had an easy ride. In the end I have worked all my life for this… (some of the ideas for The Enemy were ideas I had when I was a teenager)
What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?
Write, write, write, write, write and read, read, read, read, read… That’s it really. It’s like riding a bike, you can read as many manuals on how to do it as you like, you can talk to experts, watch videos, look it up on the web, talk to other cyclists, but in the end you will only be able to learn to cycle if you get in the saddle and start pedalling, You will fall off a few times to start with but the more you do it, the better you will get at it. And read. If you don’t love books you won’t love writing books. See how the writers you love do it, and steal from them! (If you really want some expert advice read Stephen King’s book ‘on writing’. It’s excellent.)
What has surprised you most about becoming a published author?
I always thought there was such a thing as ‘literary society’, places you would go to mingle with other authors and have literary conversations. But there isn’t. We all work in isolation, tapping away in our little boxes. I enjoy doing literary festivals because you do get to meet other authors there, but on the whole we’re not all part of the same club. The other thing I’ve discovered is that you have to sell A HELL OF A LOT OF BOOKS to make any money at it.
  • From Goodreads: When Willie arrives in Indian Territory, she knows only one thing: no one can find out who she really is. To escape a home she doesn't belong in anymore, she assumes the name of a former classmate and accepts a teaching job at the Cherokee Female Seminary. Nothing prepares her for what she finds there. Her pupils are the daughters of the Cherokee elite—educated and more wealthy than she, and the school is cloaked in mystery. A student drowned in the river last year, and the girls whisper that she was killed by a jealous lover. Willie's room is the very room the dead girl slept in. The students say her spirit haunts it. Willie doesn't believe in ghosts, but when strange things start happening at the school, she isn't sure anymore. She's also not sure what to make of a boy from the nearby boys' school who has taken an interest in her—his past is cloaked in secrets. Soon, even she has to admit that the revenant may be trying to tell her something. . . .
How long did you work on this book?
I spent several months researching THE REVENANT and wrote the first draft during NaNoWriMo '08. I revised over the next three months, incorporating feedback from my crit partners and agent. It sold in May of '09. But that wasn't the end of the work, of course! My editor Michelle Frey and I went through two major rounds of revision, followed by one small round and then copy-edits. Nearly two years of work, in all.

How was your journey to publication? Long, short, how many rejections?
I started a novel when I was teaching high school English, but only managed to finish it when I had a very capable student teacher who took over my classes for a few weeks. (I am in awe of full-time teachers who write on the side -- they are superheroes, in my mind.) That story won a contest and generated a little interest -- some requests for partials and fulls -- but overall it was not strong enough to get an agent and ended up in a drawer. My second novel, an Arthurian romance, got me an agent (yay for Jennifer Laughran!), but did not sell. My resulting panic pushed me into "must sell a novel" overdrive, and that resulted in THE REVENANT (as detailed above). I'd say I was the seemingly typical "five years to sell a book" story.

What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?
I say this a lot, but I think it's important to repeat: aspiring writers should read everything they can get their hands on in their preferred genre and reader age group. You simply MUST have a good understanding of the market. I'm not saying that one should write to the market -- just understand it so that you can write something that is both appropriate for that market and unique enough to stand apart. Also, be willing to share your writing with others. Be open to feedback and constructive criticism. And don't give up!

What has surprised you most about becoming a published author?
Good surprises: meeting other writers, either in person or online. The YA world is full of lovely people! They inspire me daily. Book bloggers also inspire me -- it's so wonderful to see how they support the books they love. Bad surprises: even after you sell a book, there's still a lot of waiting. And rejection. But you just gotta roll with it.

Dead End by Jason Myers
  • From Goodreads: Dru and Gina are young, in love, and can’t wait to get out of Marshall, Nebraska, a town where bloodline means everything and whoever has the money makes the rules. But all their dreams are shattered when Gina has a monstrous run-in with the son of the richest man in Marshall—an incident that leaves her broken, battered, and violated. Driven by rage, Dru and Gina take matters into their own hands, and quickly find themselves in over their heads. Without any other options, Dru and Gina are on the run. But there’s more chasing them than they think, and love might not be enough to save them.
How long did you work on this book?
Well I first started thinking about Dead End back in 2008. I'd long wanted to write a book about that took place in the small towns and down the back roads of the Midwest. To kind of create a Midwestern Gothic in the same breath that the movie Undertow did as a Southern chase Gothic thriller. So way back then I was already thinking about it but I was consumed at the time with a full-time job and I was also writing my second book The Mission. It wasn't until probably November of 2009 before I sat down and started working on the outline for Dead End. I typed that up and submitted it to my agent in January of 2010 and about six weeks later, we had two book deal in place with my publisher, Simon Pulse. From there, I wrote the first draft of the book in two months, finishing in May, and then I did three rewrites after that until we settled on the finished version. So yeah, it was quite the process. About seven months of actually writing and rewriting the book and about two years of working on it as a whole. Thank God it's finally coming out!

How was your journey to publication? Long, short, how many rejections?
The journey was exactly what I wrote in the first answer. A lot of times, writers think about a particular story and develop it in their heads for awhile before they begin to construct it on paper or on the computer. That's what happened with Dead End. The idea and then it was only after The Mission was completed that I started creating that world as a hard copy. The rejections never came with Dead End. Since Simon Pulse had published my first two books, Exit Here as well as The Mission and since both were doing extremely well, it was just an obvious choice to take the outline to them. And it was nice to have that because we knew they were going to publish it based on how good it was and also based on how successful those first two books had been for them. It was a luxury that most beginning authors don't get. Which I certainly didn't get with Exit Here.

What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?
My advice to other writers would be to take it seriously first and foremost. Be on top of it, work, work, work, and don't get frustrated with rejections or writer's block. It happens a bit to all of us. Also, get an agent first before sending your book out and embrace the rewrites because that really is where the good stuff happens.

What has surprised you most about becoming a published author?
The most surprising thing about becoming published is the sense of urgency to keep producing all the time. Maybe I was naive when I was first published because I thought there would be a sense of comfort and relief but instead, my foot's been on the pedal since that moment and hasn't let up one bit. And l love it! I get to write books for a living, tell the stories I want to everyday, I mean, that's so cool to me and I'm so grateful for the opportunity I've been given.

All the Things You Are by Courtney Sheinmel
  • From Goodreads: Carly Wheeler lives a charmed life. Her mother is a stylist for the soap opera Lovelock Falls, she lives in a nice house, and goes to an excellent private school. But when her mom is arrested and charged with embezzlement, everything starts to unravel. There are shocking stories about her mother's crimes in the local newspaper. Carly's friends start avoiding her. And her stepfather starts worrying about money. How can Carly put her life back together when it feels like she's missing all the pieces?
How long did you work on this book?
The idea for ALL THE THINGS YOU ARE came to me several years ago, back when I was a litigation associate at a New York City law firm. One day a partner pulled me into a meeting with a potential new client – this soft-spoken woman, a single mom to two teenaged kids. After her husband died, money was tight, and the supervisor at her job suggested she use her corporate credit card to pay for personal items. But now the company was onto her (and onto the supervisor, too). Other attorneys in my office were enraged by this woman’s story, but I felt so sorry for her. I believed what she said – that she only did it because she wanted her kids’ not to feel the financial strain from the loss of their father – and I thought that one bad decision shouldn’t determine everything about a person. The woman ended up going to another law firm, and I never saw again, but I kept thinking about her. I knew she was sentenced to time in prison and I wondered what would happen to her kids.

At some point, there was so much in my head, I had to turn it into a book. I changed a lot of details, but kept the idea that most people are neither all good nor all bad; usually we’re somewhere in the middle, trying our best. But sometimes it’s hard not to think the worst about a person when a mistake is made that impacts the lives of all of those around her. Once I started writing, it took about nine months to complete the first draft.

How was your journey to publication? Long, short, how many rejections?
When I finished the manuscript of my first book, I called a former law school professor of mine, himself a published writer, and asked for advice. He suggested I send it to his agent, and let me use his name. (Thank you, Thane!) Three months later, I signed on with another agent in the same agency, and a month after that, I had a publishing contract with Simon & Schuster. I know it was an obnoxiously easy journey to publication. I wish the same for everyone!

What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?
My usual advice is: Read a lot – every day. Write every day. Write about what interests YOU, whatever that may be. And keep a journal.

Recently, a writer friend passed along another piece of advice. I was upset about something that had nothing to do with work, and she said, “You just have to try and be the best Courtney.” Now I think of that every day as I’m pounding the keyboard: I just want the words on the page to be MY best.

What has surprised you most about becoming a published author?
The biggest surprise, and one of the greatest gifts I’ve ever received, is being part of the incredible Kid Lit/Young Adult writing community. When I left law firm life, the one thing I thought maybe I would miss was walking out into the hall and having people right there to bounce ideas off of, to commiserate about a particularly rough day, or just to chat. I left to pursue my dreams; but I’m a pretty social person and could I really spend all day, every day, sitting in my little apartment, all by myself?

The truth is, I am never all by myself. In the past three years, I’ve met a lot of people who do the same thing I do for a living. We talk on the phone, meet up to flesh out plotlines, and sometimes write side-by-side (shout-out to the fabulous Sarah Mlynowski!). The sense of belonging is so significant that even on my worst writing days, I can cry in gratitude that this is what I get to be a part of. (Yes, I’m just that sentimental.) And a supreme bonus: My sister, Alyssa B. Sheinmel, is part of the community too.

Ordinary Beauty by Laura Weiss
  • From Goodreads: How can you make someone love you when they won’t? And what if that person happens to be your mother? Sayre Bellavia grew up knowing she was a mistake: unplanned and unwanted. At five months shy of eighteen, she’s become an expert in loneliness, heartache, and neglect. Her whole life she’s been cursed, used, and left behind. Swallowed a thousand tears and ignored a thousand deliberate cruelties. Sayre’s stuck by her mother through hell, tried to help her, be near her, be important to her even as her mother slipped away into a violent haze of addiction, destroying the only chance Sayre ever had for a real family. Now her mother is lying in a hospital bed, near death, ravaged by her own destructive behavior. And as Sayre fights her way to her mother’s bedside, she is terrified but determined to get the answer to a question no one should ever have to ask: Did my mother ever really love me? And what will Sayre do if the answer is yes?
How long did you work on this book?
I was working to deadline, so Ordinary Beauty took me about a year to write, and of course, rewrite.

How was your journey to publication? Long, short, how many rejections?
My journey, like so many other authors I've spoken to and read about, was not for the weak of heart! Having a lifelong love affair with reading and words always seems to be the beginning, and I was no exception. My mother and I used to go to the library every week with a shopping bag, and leave with it full of exciting and adventurous books.

I used to write stories, too – that was always my one easy A in school – but I never consciously thought about being an author until much later, when one day I asked myself a really scary question: Did I want to take writing for fun, which was my second favorite thing to do, and see if I could learn to do it well enough to actually be published? Put my words out there alone into the world to be hailed or humiliated? What if readers thought I was the stupidest person who ever picked up a pen? Could I stand it if I failed? I decided that yes, I could, because the never-knowing would be worse, so why not, let's go for it, and so I went back to the library armed with a shopping bag and took out every single book I could find on the craft of writing fiction – theme, dialogue, character development, just everything – and I started reading.

Writing for middle grade and young adults was never a conscious decision. Those were the characters who showed up and the stories that came out, and so I went on to research markets, and submit my work. And oh yes, I received rejections. Hundreds. (No exaggeration.) Sometimes, after reading the rejected story again, I could see why it had been denied and was both embarrassed and grateful for it. Other times I just got mad, and rewrote and sent it back out again.

And I discovered something interesting: Those rejections made me work harder, learn all I could and become even more determined not to give up.

The first acceptance was golden. It paid pennies but who cared? I was finally a published author, and deliriously happy. Then there was another acceptance, and another. Still rejections coming in on stories – I've garnered plenty – but now it seemed like it was starting to balance out.

Occasionally, when I told people that I wrote short stories and was actually published, they would say, "Oh yeah? So, when are you going to write a book?" That was maddening, as they had no idea the work that had gone into crafting those stories, and sending them out, so instead of kicking them in the shins I would just take a deep breath and answer airily, "Don’t worry, I'll write a book when I have something to say."

And then one day, I had a violent reaction to a news story, and in my head, characters were born. All of sudden I did have something to say, so I hustled right back to the library and started learning how to craft a novel.

What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?
If you love to write, keep going. Don't give up. Keep learning and revising and perfecting your manuscript. Don't protect your characters. Their mess is your story. What are you passionate about? What makes you happy, furious, heartbroken, terrified or joyous? Let those strong emotions spill over into your book. Don't hold back. Trust the process.

What has surprised you most about becoming a published author?
That with each story you write, each character you live with and each dilemma you explore, you learn something new, and I love that.

Also, the first time I received a reader email saying how much the book meant to them, how they laughed, cried and really identified with the characters just knocked my socks off. I wasn't prepared for it, and it was the best feeling, ever. It made the reader in me really happy, and it still does, every single time.

Bad Girls Don't Die: From Bad to Cursed by Katie Alender
  • From Goodreads: Alexis is the last girl you'd expect to sell her soul for beauty and popularity. After all, she already has everything she needs--an adorable boyfriend, the perfect best friend, and a family that finally seems to be healing after her sister Kasey's unfortunate possession by an evil spirit. But then Kasey tells Alexis about the mysterious new club she has joined, and the oath she has taken to someone named Aralt. Worried that Kasey's gotten in over her head again, Alexis and her best friend Megan decide to investigate by joining the Sunshine Club, too. At first, their connection with Aralt seems harmless. Alexis tries a new -- normal-- look, and finds herself reveling in her elegance and success. Still, despite the Sunshine Club's outward perfection, the group is crumbling from within, and soon Alexis finds herself battling her own personal demons. She can hardly even remember why she joined in the first place. Surely it wasn't to destroy Aralt...why would she hurt someone who has given her so much, and asked for so little in return?
How long did you work on this book?
The first book in the series, Bad Girls Don't Die, was a project that took me several years, stealing writing time in the morning and at night. From Bad to Cursed was written much more quickly--from the germ of the idea to copyedits in about eleven months. And the third book is on a similar schedule.

How was your journey to publication? Long, short, how many rejections?
It took me a long time to decide to really try to get published. Then I found an agent quickly, went out on submissions, and was rejected (apparently I have a "vivid imagination"). One of the editors liked the book enough to give me notes, and when I implemented those changes, she made an offer on it.

What advice would you most like to pass along to other writers?
Find a way to be content where you are. Reaching milestones like getting published or getting a series can be wonderful; but they also open the door for new, different kinds of insecurity. Find peace and happiness with yourself as a person and as a writer outside of, rather than as a product of, the publishing industry.

What has surprised you most about becoming a published author?
How hard it can be to make yourself sit down and do the work, in spite of the fact that this is a dream job. Also, the amount of marketing and publicity work authors are expected to do for themselves. It's really not optional these days.

Additional Releases

Hourglass by Myra McEntire
  • From Goodreads: One hour to rewrite the past . . . For seventeen-year-old Emerson Cole, life is about seeing what isn’t there: swooning Southern Belles; soldiers long forgotten; a haunting jazz trio that vanishes in an instant. Plagued by phantoms since her parents’ death, she just wants the apparitions to stop so she can be normal. She’s tried everything, but the visions keep coming back. So when her well-meaning brother brings in a consultant from a secretive organization called the Hourglass, Emerson’s willing to try one last cure. But meeting Michael Weaver may not only change her future, it may change her past. Who is this dark, mysterious, sympathetic guy, barely older than Emerson herself, who seems to believe every crazy word she says? Why does an electric charge seem to run through the room whenever he’s around? And why is he so insistent that he needs her help to prevent a death that never should have happened?

Imaginary Girls by Nova Ren Suma
  • From Goodreads: Chloe's older sister, Ruby, is the girl everyone looks to and longs for, who can't be captured or caged. When a night with Ruby's friends goes horribly wrong and Chloe discovers the dead body of her classmate London Hayes left floating in the reservoir, Chloe is sent away from town and away from Ruby. But Ruby will do anything to get her sister back, and when Chloe returns to town two years later, deadly surprises await. As Chloe flirts with the truth that Ruby has hidden deeply away, the fragile line between life and death is redrawn by the complex bonds of sisterhood.
Paper Covers Rock by Jenny Hubbard
  • From Goodreads: At the beginning of his junior year at a boys' boarding school, 16-year-old Alex is devastated when he fails to save a drowning friend. When questioned, Alex and his friend Glenn, who was also at the river, begin weaving their web of lies. Plagued by guilt, Alex takes refuge in the library, telling his tale in a journal he hides behind Moby-Dick. Caught in the web with Alex and Glenn is their English teacher, Miss Dovecott, fresh out of Princeton, who suspects there's more to what happened at the river when she perceives guilt in Alex's writing for class. She also sees poetic talent in Alex, which she encourages. As Alex responds to her attention, he discovers his true voice, one that goes against the boarding school bravado that Glenn embraces. When Glenn becomes convinced that Miss Dovecott is out to get them, Alex must choose between them.

Belladonna by Mary Finn
  • From Goodreads: When Thomas Rose first spots the girl hidden by the roadside, she looks as drab as a lark, with only her red kerchief giving her away. But French Hélène, who goes by "Ling," is no ordinary bird. Tiny Ling enchants Thomas with her wild spirit and tales of a circus where she danced atop her beloved horse, Belladonna. But the horse has been sold, and Ling must fetch her back. Now Thomas’s life as a clever but unschooled wheelwright’s son is about to change. Their search leads to painter George Stubbs, who euthanizes ailing animals in order to study their anatomy. Stubbs draws eerie horses that stride as if they could move out of the paper world into the real one - but he assures his young friends that their horse is safe at a nearby estate. As Ling and Thomas devise a risky plan to recover Belladonna, Stubbs hires Thomas as an apprentice, teaching him to read and write as well. In this fascinating story, Mary Finn incorporates a real eighteenth-century artist into a beautifully imagined tale of adventure and young romance.
The Chamber of Five by Michael Harmon
  • From Goodreads: In a private-school conspiracy novel, 16-year-old Jason Weatherby knows exactly why he's at the Lambert School for the Gifted. And it's not for his brains. His dad is an influential state senator. It's this same connection that lands him a spot on the secretive Chamber of Five, the elite group of students who run the school with a shadow government, tapping into the same lines of powers as their parents. When he's asked to physically assault and ruin the reputation of another student as part of his initiation, Jason sees firsthand the depravity of the Chamber—and decides to work from the inside to take it down. But Jason taps into a conspiracy—and school secrets—far more insidious than he could ever have imagined. From award-winning author Michael Harmon comes a taut, thrillingly paced novel about the perils of privilege. Can one bold student set things right?

The Lost Crown by Sarah Miller
  • From Goodreads: Olga, Tatiana, Maria, and Anastasia. Like the fingers on a hand--first headstrong Olga; then Tatiana, the tallest; Maria the most hopeful for a ring; and Anastasia, the smallest. These are the daughters of Tsar Nicholas II, grand dutchesses living a life steeped in tradition and priviledge. They are each on the brink of starting their own lives, at the mercy of royal matchmakers. The summer of 1914 is that precious last wink of time when they can still be sisters together--sisters that link arms and laugh, sisters that share their dreams and worries, and flirt with the officers of their imperial yacht. But in a gunshot the future changes for these sisters and for Russia. As World War I ignites across Europe, political unrest sweeps Russia. First dissent, then disorder, mutiny, and revolution. For Olga, Tatiana, Maria and Anastasia, the end of their girlhood together is colliding with the end of more than they ever imagined. At the same time hopeful and hopeless, naive and wise, the voices of these sisters become a chorus singing the final song of Imperial Russia. Impeccably researched and utterly fascinating, this novel by acclaimed author Sarah Miller recounts the final days of Imperial Russia with lyricism, criticism and true compassion.

Sisterhood Everlasting: A Novel (The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants) by Ann Brashares
  • From Goodreads: From #1 New York Times bestselling author Ann Brashares comes the welcome return of the characters whose friendship became a touchstone for a generation. Now Tibby, Lena, Carmen, and Bridget have grown up, starting their lives on their own. And though the jeans they shared are long gone, the sisterhood is everlasting. Despite having jobs and men that they love, each knows that something is missing: the closeness that once sustained them. Carmen is a successful actress in New York, engaged to be married, but misses her friends. Lena finds solace in her art, teaching in Rhode Island, but still thinks of Kostos and the road she didn’t take. Bridget lives with her longtime boyfriend, Eric, in San Francisco, and though a part of her wants to settle down, a bigger part can’t seem to shed her old restlessness. Then Tibby reaches out to bridge the distance, sending the others plane tickets for a reunion that they all breathlessly await. And indeed, it will change their lives forever—but in ways that none of them could ever have expected.

Trial by Fire: A Raised by Wolves Novel by Jennifer Barnes
  • From Goodreads: Bryn is now leader of the Cedar Ridge pack of werewolves and she's convinced that her pack is different - it's democratic and fair. Then Bryn finds a battered teenage Were, Connor, bleeding on her front porch. He begs Bryn to protect him from an abusive leader; Bryn takes him into her pack. But Bryn's Were partner Chase doesn't trust the new boy, and the more time she spends helping Connor, the more aggressive Chase becomes. Bryn is not sure if it's jealousy, or Were possessiveness but for the first time she starts to feel suffocated by the bond she and Chase share. Filled with action, unlikely allies, and deadly conspiracies, Trial by Fire will change Bryn forever. She is soon to realise that to lead a pack of werewolves, she must give in to her animal instincts and become a little less human. And as hard as it's going to be, Bryn is going to have to do it alone. There can only be one alpha.

The Demon's Surrender (Demon's Lexicon) by Sarah Rees Brennan
  • From Goodreads: The Demon's Surrender is the thrilling and suspenseful conclusion to the Demon's Lexicon trilogy.

Giveaway

If you fill out the form below and leave a comment on this post, you'll be entered to win DEAD END, THE REVENANT, FROM BAD TO CURSED, ORDINARY BEAUTY, ALL THINGS YOU ARE, and THE DEAD. The contest is open to US residents and winners will be announced on Thursday!

Happy reading,
The Ladies of ACP

56 comments:

  1. Thanks so much for the interviews and giveaways! There are so many books coming out this week that I CANNOT wait to read!

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  2. I am so excited for Imaginary Girls by Nova Ren Suma, plus so many more. Thanks for this!

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  3. Great interviews & books. I can't believe that Lauren Kate can revise in a month. I wish I could.

    I can't wait to read The Demon's Surrender.

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  4. OMG so excited for this week's releases :D So many amazing books coming out! Superduper excited for Demon's Surrender

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  5. Wow, so many great books out this week! Thanks for spotlighting Ordinary Beauty and All the Things You Are - I will definitely check them out

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  6. Oh, wow, THE REVENANT sounds so cool! Glad to see some underused Native American themes coming into play. I am SO excited for IMAGINARY GIRLS, as well!

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  7. Can't wait to read Hourglass and Imaginary Girls! Great books being released!

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  8. Awesome releases this week! Thanks for the awesome giveaway :-)

    -MadiganHeart

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  9. Lots of goodies this week that I want to read.

    I'm reading Torment again so that I can start Passion later this week. Why do I have a bad feeling this isn't a trilogy after all?

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  10. The number of giveaways you folks have is amazing. Thank you, again, for showing us all these different authors!

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  11. So many great books this week! Thanks for the interviews and inspiration, too.

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  12. Thanks for the giveaways and inspiring interviews! :)

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  13. So many fantastic books this week. DEAD END sounds amazing, and I've been wanting to read HOURGLASS for months. Thanks for the giveaway!

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  14. Oh my goodness, so many good books coming out this week. I spot five I've been anxiously awaiting, including The Demon's Covenant and Hourglass!

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  15. There are so many awesome books this week!

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  16. Holy cow, what amazing books! I always love reading about paths to publication. Thanks :D

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  17. I'm excited to read Imaginary Girls and Hourglass. Great books coming out this week.

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  18. I have been waiting on four of these books for sure and the others are new ones to add to my list. This is fabulous. Thanks for the opportunity!

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  19. Wow YA just gets better and better, doesn't it?
    Putting Ordinary Beauty on my list now.

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  20. So many of these books are on my wishlist! I am so excited to read Sisterhood Everlasting :)

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  21. This week has the best books coming out! Been waiting so long for these. Especially Hourglass and Imaginary Girls!

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  22. Another round of great books in this giveaway. Sweet!

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  23. These books ARE hot. I can't wait to get my copies of some!

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  24. Thanks! It is a hot week for books! I added several to my amazon wish list.

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  25. Well, this is an excellent week. I'm really excited for Revenant and The Dead.

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  26. Great interviews, again. These certainly are some HOT books. I'm looking forward to reading The Revenant, Imaginary Girls, Hourglass and Paper Covers Rock.

    Thanks for the chance to win!

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  27. Do you think if I start following my UPS driver up and down the neighborhood streets tomorrow he'll give me my Amazon box with PASSION inside!!!???? I'm prepared to be a stalker just to get my hands on that bok even five minutes sooner! Can't wait!

    Great post! Lots to be added to my TBR list.

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  28. So excited for a ton of these! Passion, of course. As well as Paper Covers Rock, Chamber of Five, and the gorgeous Imaginary Girls. Some of the others sound really good, too!

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  29. I am really curious about the Sisterhood Everlasting. I hope I like it as well as I liked the other books!

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  30. I love to hear from authors how long it took to write their novel. Some of the answers really take me by surprise.

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  31. They all look like such good books! And I enjoy reading about how authors write-- neat post.

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  32. Another great giveaway. Thanks!

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  33. So many great books this week. I can't wait to read Hourglass, it looks so good!

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  34. I have been looking forward to reading Passion and The Dead. I've heard a lot of good things about Hourglass, too. Actually, all of these books sound great!

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  35. All the Things You are and Revenants sound particularly appealing to. I love the authors advice and their insights, esp. on rejection.

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  36. So many good books!!! I cant wait to read these!!! :-)

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  37. I've been looking forward to quite a few of these!

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  38. Wow what a huge list of great books! I also love finding out about ones I haven't heard of yet.

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  39. Victoria ZumbrumJune 13, 2011 at 9:31 PM

    So many great books this week. Alot of good reads. Thanks for the contest. Tore923@aol.com

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  40. You're right! So many HOT books! I think I'm most excited about Myra's :)

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  41. This week is filled with insanely good releases! It's unbelievable the number of books that are coming out that I desperately want. Thank your (as always) for offering up copies of so many of these great titles.

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  42. So many great titles! Can't wait to read Passion, and The Lost Crown looks amazing! Thanks again!

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  43. This is still my go-to source for debuts!

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  44. I can't wait to find some of these! I especially like those NaNoWriMo novels-way to go publishing something you write in only a month!

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  45. There are some GREAT books coming out this week. I'm particularly looking forward to The Revenant.

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  46. Definitely looking forward to The Revenant as well. There are so many books to add to my reading list... and I couldn't be more excited!

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  47. Wow this is a fantastic set this week. I cannot wait for Trial by Fire. Raised by Wolves was absolutely amazing to read!

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  48. I totally have the Passion on the want list this week.

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  49. I want Hourglass so much. I hate being on a self-imposed book buying ban.

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  50. I'd really like to read THE REVENANT! I've been hearing good things about it!

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  51. There's a lot of great books this week! I can't wait to read Passion!

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  52. So many great books this week! I've added many of them to my to-read list!

    Thank you for the chance to win!
    methom@earthlink.net
    GFC follower - Mary Ellen Thompson
    Twitter follower - MaryEllenT

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  53. great giveaway!

    kristina shields

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  54. So excited for The Revenant! The others look cool too!

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  55. Wow, I am having the hardest time posting today. Eh! I have heard of many of these, but not all of them. I will definitely be adding to my TBR list.

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  56. Great interview!There's a lot of great books released this week.

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